in

How To To Make People Like You

Meeting new people can be awkward and we’ve all felt nervous from time to time about whether people will like us or not. It could be starting a new school, going to an event, or starting a new job. We want to meet new people and make new friends, but worry that we will say the wrong thing or find it difficult to fit in. Whether you want there are many things that you can do to make that happen.  

I – Be genuinely interested in others

Doing unto others as you would have them do unto you is one thing. Expecting others to do unto you as you would do unto them, without any effort on your part, is something else entirely. A genuine interest in others is the gift that keeps on giving. If you’re interested only in getting others to be interested in you, then you’re destined to go nowhere. Self- less interest, on the other hand, builds trust; trust leads to new relationships; new relationships mean more business. Showing interest in others also provides an opportunity for honest self-reflection: If you’re truly not interested in a certain group of people, then maybe you should ask yourself why you wish to associate with them in the first place. Would you ever want to work for someone who didn’t care about you as a person? If not, then why should you expect them to hire you if you don’t care about them? 

II – Smile

Never underestimate the power of a good smile. It’s the one tool of first impressions to which we all have access. In addition to setting a friendly tone, it tells people you’re someone who’s open to possibilities. A closed mouth equals a closed mind. 

III – Remember people’s names

Third: Remember people’s names. This may seem like a given, but for that very reason it’s too often ignored. We’ve all been in that awkward situation where we forget or don’t catch someone’s name. If and when that happens, ask again to confirm, or find a creative way (like exchanging business cards) to get it in your head.

IV – Listen to others

This means not only listening to what people tell you, but also creating opportunities for listening. Find out who they are by asking about them, and they’ll know more about you than you could ever express in your own words. Our tendency to gush rather than absorb reflects an ego-driven conditioning that ends only when you put a stop to it. A restaurant manager, for example, who doesn’t listen to the complaints of his customers and respond accordingly, will lose those customers. It’s simply not good business practice. Part of the problem is that we neglect to forecast the long-term effects of our actions. Being more aware of those effects gives you an edge over those seeking immediate rewards.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading…

0

Comments

0 comments

How To Travel and Enjoy Europe Cheap